Friday, November 4, 2011

What's That Tingling in My Feet?

If you are a patient with diabetes, you may want to talk to your podiatrist about diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders that can be caused by diabetes. People with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may have symptoms such as pain, tingling, or numbness- loss of feeling- in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Diabetic neuropathies often manifest in your feet and may even be the first sign that you have developed diabetes.
The longer you live with diabetes, the more likely it is that you may develop neuropathy. Furthermore, this problem becomes magnified if you have difficulty controlling your blood sugars. However, some patients with diabetes never develop neuropathy and have no symptoms at all. Mild cases of neuropathy may go unnoticed for many years- and remain untreated. Symptoms of numbness, tingling, or burning should be brought to the attention of your podiatrist as there may be treatments available to help alleviate these sensations.
If you and your podiatrist discover that you do have neuropathy, there are a number of things you can do to keep your feet healthy:
*Check your feet every day and if necessary, use a mirror to view the bottoms and sides of your feet. Call your podiatrist at the first sign of swelling, redness, cuts, infection, or abnormalities.
*Make sure that your shoes are free of any debris before sliding them on. Even a tiny stone can cause damage.
*Have your primary care physician check your feet during each general visit. If a problem is identified, the physician will refer you to your podiatrist.
*Choose the right shoes. Shoes that are too tight or that rub can cause serious problems that can develop into serious health concerns.
*Wear white or light colored socks so that you can see if any blood or fluid from a sore may have developed during the day.
*Always wash your feet in lukewarm water. Dry them carefully, especially between your toes, and use products such as creams and powders that have been approved by your podiatrist or have the APMA Seal of Approval.
*Do not walk barefoot, even at home. You never know what may be lurking on your floors and in your carpets.
*Visit your podiatrist frequently to make sure that your diabetes is under control and that your feet stay healthy.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Thursday, November 3, 2011

Knock your Socks Off!

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and Central Connecticut Foot Care Center is dedicated to helping educate our patients and the community about this epidemic.
According to the American Diabetes Association, nearly 12% of the Hispanic population has diabetes and 66% are at risk of developing the disease when compared to other ethnic groups. When it comes to your feet, diabetes is a very dangerous disease and should not be ignored. Even if you have your diabetes under control, you should see a podiatrist for routine diabetic foot care. Diabetes is the leading cause of non-traumatic lower-limb amputations and with proper care, most amputations can be avoided.
Think you know a lot about diabetes? Take this quiz created by the American Podiatric Medical Association to test your knowledge!
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Monday, October 31, 2011

Orthotics: What Are They?

Orthotics are custom molded devices which are designed specifically for your feet and then placed in your shoes. They are intended to correct abnormal foot biomechanics. They perform functions that make standing, walking, and running more comfortable and efficient by altering the angles at which the foot strikes a walking or running surface. Doctors of podiatric medicine prescribe orthotics as a conservative approach to many foot problems or as a method of control after certain types of foot surgery; their use is a highly successful, practical form of treatment.
Orthotics take various forms and are constructed of various materials. They fall into three broad categories: those that primarily attempt to change foot function, those that are primarily protective in nature, and those that combine functional control and protection. Orthotics can be categorized as rigid, semi-rigid, and soft.
The so-called rigid orthotic device, designed to control function, may be made of a firm material such as plastic or carbon fiber and is used primarily for walking or dress shoes. It is generally fabricated from a plaster mold of the individual foot. The finished device normally extends along the sole from the heel to the ball of toes of the foot. It is worn mostly in closed shoes with a heel height under two inches.
The semi-rigid orthotic provides for dynamic balance of the foot while walking or participating in sports. Each sport has its own demands and each sport orthotic needs to constructed appropriately with the specific sport and athlete in mind. This functional dynamic orthotic helps guide the foot through proper functions, allowing the muscles and tendons to perform more efficiently. The classic semi-rigid orthotic is constructed of layers of soft materla, reinforced with more rigid materials.
The soft orthotic device helps to absorb shock, increase balance, and take pressure off uncomfortable or sore spots. It is usually constructed of soft, compressible materials, and may be molded by the action of the foot in walking or fashioned over a plaster impression of the foot. This orthotic usually extends from the heel past the ball of the foot to include the toes. The advantage of any soft orthotic device is that it may be easily adjusted to changing weight-bearing forces. The disadvantage is that it must be periodically replaced or refurbished.
Various other orthotics may be used for multidirectional sports or edge-control sports by casting the foot within the ski boot, ice skate boot, or inline skate boot. Combinations of semi-flexible material and soft material to accomodate painful areas are utilized for specific problems.
Only a licensed health care professional can diagnose and prescribe medical treatments, including orthotics. There are some outstanding over-the-counter products which your podiatrist may recommend as an interim treatment, but remember that you will want the advice of your doctor before buying these devices from a retail store, since wearing the wrong type of insert can be detrimental to feet, especially for people with diabetes or arthritis.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Thursday, October 27, 2011

Should I Go To the ER?

Foot and ankle trauma is all too common in the fall when kids go back to school and participate in fal sports. In addition, many of us ramp up our exercise regimens as temperatures become more moderate. When faced with what to do and where to go for foot and ankle injuries such as a twisted ankle, broken toe, or open laceration, here are some tips:
*Today's podiatrists have been educated and trained to diagnose and treat injuries of the foot and ankle.
*Most foot and ankle injuries can be evaluated and treated by the podiatrist in his or her office, saving a trip to the emergency room.
*Most podiatrists have X-ray equipment in their offices, so they can determine if your foot or ankle is fractured or just sprained.
*If you decide to go to an emergency room, ask to see a podiatrist.
Wait times and insurance co-payments are often less in your podiatrist's office than in an emergency room. If in doubt, call your podiatrist to determine where you should go if you injure your foot or ankle.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Thursday, September 22, 2011

ING Hartford Marathon

On a crisp fall morning at 8AM, more than 10,000 people will wait for the sound of horn. Some have been preparing for this event all their lives, while some are brand new and have just begun this year. No matter what level, this is a major event in their careers. 45,000 people will wait, watch, and cheer them on in a race to the finish.
Running careers, that is. October 15, 2011 is the ING Hartford Marathon and Half Marathon, an event which three of our patients will take part in. The full marathon will take runners through Hartford, East Hartford, and South Windsor, while half marathon runners will travel through Hartford and West Hartford.
There are many opportunities to volunteer at the race, with jobs ranging from course clean-up to selling merchanidise. Runners may also chose to run for a cause, like the American Cancer Society or Jane Do No More.
We wish all of our patients who are running the best of luck, good times, and healthy feet!
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Boots Day by Day: Wednesday

Style: Classic Cowboy Boots
Problem: Narrow toebox can caused blistered and cramped toes.
Solution: Wear only for short periods of time and allow toes to stretch.
Our recommendation: Ariat Heritage Western Russet Rebel. Available from http://www.zappos.com/. $169.95.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Boots Day by Day: Tuesday

Style: Playful Rain Boot
Problem: Rigid shape limits natural foot movement and provides no arch support.
Solution: Try cushioned insoles and arch supports.
Our recommendation: Land's End Wellie Boot. Available from http://www.landsend.com/. $69.50

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Monday, September 12, 2011

Boots Day by Day: Monday

Style: Sleek Riding Boots.
Problem: Synthetic materials trap in heat and moisture, causing odor.
Solution: Select natural materials like leather that allow proper airflow and keep feet dry.
Our recommendation: Land's End Diana Low Heel Riding Boots. Available through http://www.landsend.com/. $168.00

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Boots Day by Day: Sunday

Style: Day of foot rest!
Problem: All that boot wearing takes a toll, even with expert podiatric advice.
Solution: Massage and apply lotion to the feet! If you must venture out, put on a pair of supportive and comfy sneakers.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Saturday, September 10, 2011

Boots Day by Day: Saturday

Style: Slouch Boot
Problem: Narrow and very high heel transfers body weight onto the ball of the foot, causing pain and numbness.
Solution: Select a lower heel or stacked style of heel for additional support.
Our recommendation: Dansko Brinkley. Available at http://www.zappos.com/. $265.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Friday, September 9, 2011

Boots Day by Day: Friday

Style: Trendy Ankle Bootie
Problem: Lack of ankle support coupled with a high heel can cause imbalance.
Solution: Select a heel no more than two inches in height and don't walk long distances.
Our recommendation: Clark's Vermont Terrace. Available through http://www.clarksusa.com/. $119.99

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Selecting the Best Boot For You


There are a lot of options when it comes to picking out boots (and this series will show you that!), but finding the best boot for your foot is key. If a style doesn't fit your foot, try another! You are not limited when it comes to boot variety. Never try to stuff your foot into anything- you will just end up with more foot problems!
*Have feet measured, size can change throught life! Keep in mind- your boot size may not fit the same in all styles and brands.
*Try boots on in the afternoon- feet tend to swell during the day.
*Buy for the larger foot- most feet are not te exact same size.
*Carry an insole when boot shopping in case a pair lack the proper arch support.
*Boots should feel comfortable when tried on in the store, there shouldn't be a "break-in" period.
*A boot constructed of natural materials, like leather, will keep feet dry and comfortable during the winter months.
*Choose a boot with plenty of toe room, a firm heel counter, and traction to ensure stability.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Back to School Shoe Shopping Part 4

When the final weeks of a care-free summer vacation come to a close, the sounds of school bells, slamming locker doors, and students clamoring into classrooms are heard loud and clear once again. But before each new school year begins, parents eagerly seek out a wide array of school supplies and stlish new fashions for their children. One of the most important purchases on any parent's back-to-school shopping list is a pair of new shoes. For many parents, back-to-school shoe shopping may seem easier than a pop-quiz in gym class- but several important factor should be considered:
*Children's feet change with age. Shoe and sock sizes may change every few months as a child's feet grow.
*Shoes that don't fit properly can aggravate the feet. Always measure a child's feet before buying shoes, and watch for signs of irritation.
*Never hand down footwear. Just because a shoe size fits one child comfortably doesn't mean it will fit another the same way. Also sharing shoes can spread fungi like athlete's foot and nail fungus.
*Examine the heels. Children may wear through the heels of shoes quicker than outgrowing shoes themselves. Uneven heel wear can indicate a foot problem that should be checked by a podiatrist.
*Take your child shoe shopping. Every shoe fits differently. Lettinga child have a say in the shoe buying process promotes healthy foot habits down the road.
*Always buy for the larger foot. Feet are seldom precisely the same size.
*Buy shoes that do not need a break in period. Shoes should be comfortable immediately. Also make sure to have your child try on shoes with socks or tights, if that's how they'll be worn.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Boot Day by Day: Thursday

Style of Boot: Furry Snow Boot
Problem: Sole can become slick in inclement weather leading to trips or falls.
Solution: Select a rubber sole with deep grooves for proper traction.
Our recommendation: Jambu Nomad. Available on http://www.zappos.com , $163.00.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Fall Shoe Clean-Up


Doing a fall clean-up of your closet and have shoes you don’t wear anymore, don’t fit, or don’t like? Drop them off at Central Connecticut Foot Care Center  at 807 Broad Street in Meriden through October 6th and we’ll donate them to Master’s Manna in Wallingford. Men’s, women’s, and children’s shoes in all sizes and styles will be accepted. Please bring gently used or like-new shoes only.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Foot Problems Sideline Basketball's Ming

Yao Ming who captured American basketball hearts when he was the No. 1 in the 2002 NBA draft retired from American basketball on July 20th. During a news conference in Shanghai the 7 foot 6 inch tall player told journalists that foot and ankle fractures were keeping him from the game. He had played just five games in the past two seasons. Yao is only 30 years old.
Ming is not only an icon in China, but across the world as well. While playing for the Washington Wizards, Ming also anchored the national team in China. His sponsorship deals included Apple, Inc., Reebok International, Coca-Cola Co., T-Mobile USA Inc., and McDonald's Corp. The Yao Ming Foundation donated $2 million to victims of the 2008 earthquake in China's Sichuan province and was an advocate against AIDS discrimination in China. Ming was ranked the fifth highest paid non-US athlete in the world, making $36 million a year.
Ming will continue his career with the Shanghai Sharks, a team which he owns and played with early in his career. He carried China's flag in the Olympic opening ceremonies in Beijing in 2008.
One of the first breaks came in February 2008, but Ming still played in the Olympic games that summer. Later, the same foot was fractured in the third game of the Rockets-Los Angeles Lakers Western Conference semifinal in 2009.
Ming is the son of two professional basketball players and is married to Ye Li, a former women's national player. They have one daughter.
Talk has recently circulated that Ming could be entered in the Basketball Hall of Fame within the next couple of years, but Ming has told them to put off the nomination.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

Dr. Scholl's New Line of Shoes

So we're all about finding shoes that are not only comfortable, stylish, and ok for your feet, and I was skeptical when I heard about Dr. Scholl's new line of shoes.
When you think of Dr. Scholl's, do you think of shoes? I think of foot products and that orthotic machine in stores that helps you pick out orthotics. Any shoes made by Dr. Scholl's that I had seen in the past were not very stylish either.
However, Dr. Scholl's Shoes, the shoe portion of Dr. Scholl's, licensed by Brown Shoe Company (whose other brands include Famous Footwear, Carlos, LifeStride, and many others) under Merck Consumer Care, began a campaign in the spring to reinvent not only the company's image as a shoe retailer, but the shoes themselves.
If you knew about Dr. Scholl's Shoes, it was probably because of the Original Exercise Sandal, which was created in the late 1960's and is still being produced today (the new version has a lighter heel made of plastic instead of wood).
Along with the new image and shoes, Dr. Scholl's introduced new technology to their shoes. There are nineteen different icons which will accompany your shoes, from memory foam cushioning, breathable, lightweight, and water resistant.
We love being able to tell our patients about shoe lines that are not only good for their feet, but good for their pocketbook too. It appears that we can add Dr. Scholl's Shoes to our list. I went on their website and checked out these new shoes. What I discovered surprised me! From ballet flats to slouchy boots, to casual sneakers, Dr. Scholl's has really stepped up the styles and fashion. Here are a few of my favorites:


Dr. Scholl's Shoe may be purchased from Dr. Scholl's directly at http://www.drschollsshoes.com/, and soon through retailers like Lord & Taylor, Macys.com, Piperlime, and Urban Outfitters.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Back-to-School Shoe Shopping Part 3

Fall is here and the kids are heading back to school. And of course, everyone wants new shoes. While the latest styles may be what your kids are screaming for, you may want to remember some important tips before letting fashion take a front seat to practicality and safety.
Kids come in all shapes and sizes and so too do their shoes. Shop at stores with experienced sales people that feature a wide selection of footwear styles, sizes, and widths. Do not assume a given size will fit the same for different brands of shoes. Avoid man-made materials (like rubber and plastic) because they limit breathability. Hand-me-down clothes are great- but not shoes. Once you've purchased those new shoes, remember to check them every several months, since kids' feet grow rapidly.
While flip flops are all the rage for the beach and the pool, they can create problems in crowded school hallways and getting on and off the school bus. While it may not be easy to coax your kids out of flip flops for school, its safer for them to wear a shoe with more support. Your podiatrist can recommend some great options for teenagers that may fit the bill in the fashion area while still providing support and comfort throughout the day.
If your children will be participating in sports this fall, send them onto the field or the court with properly fitted shoes that are designed for that specific sport. Basketball shoes, for example, are designed for quick stops and starts, and ankle support, while a football cleat needs to serve an entirely different purpose. Let the shoe fit the sport and try to get help when choosing shoes for each sport.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Monday, September 5, 2011

Back-to-School Shoe Shopping Part 2

This video was produced by the American Podiatric Medical Association and is an excellent how-to guide on selecting the proper footwear for your children this back-to-school season.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Back to School Shoe Shopping Part 1

As parents and children begin the annual hunt for deals on back-to-school items, shopping for healthy shoes should top the "must-buy" list for more important reasons than just a fashionable new look. According to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA), well-fitting shoes not only reduce the incidence of foot and ankle injuries in kids, but also encourage physical activity, helping to decrease the likelihood of childhood obesity.
Your podiatrist will tell you that if your child's feet hurt, he or she will be far less likely to participate in outdoor sports and other activities that keep him or her moving and physically fit. With childhood obesity considered an epidemic today, it is vital that parent take just a few moments during this busy back-to-school season to select a shoe that provides adequate support and fits properly. It is one of the easiest ways to keep your child pain-free and healthy.
Shopping for healthy shoes, however, can be a daunting task without knowing what to look for- but the following APMA tips can make your back-to-school purchases easy, smart, and safe.
*Before buying a shoe perform the "1, 2, 3 Test":  First, squeeze the back of a shoe's heel and ensure that it does not collapse. Second, grab the front (toe box) of the shoe and make sure that the shoe bends where the child's toes would naturally bend in the shoe. Third, grab the shoe at both ends and try to gently twist. Shoes should never twist in the middle and should be rigid. If a shoe fails any of these three steps, don't buy it.
*Look for the APMA's Seal of Acceptance. Many products, including select children's footwear models made by Pediped, Reebok, and Tsukihoski, have been awarded the APMA's Seal of Acceptance for demonstrating proper foot health. Look for the APMA Seal on product packaging or a manufacturer's website.
*Never hand down footwear. Sharing shoes can spread and encourage the growth of fungus and bacteria such as athlete's foot, and regardless of shoe size, shoes can fit every child differently.
*Have a child's foot professionally measured regularly.  Most shoe stores will be happy to professionally measure a child's foot, or your podiatrist can measure you child's foot during a foot health check-up to ensure proper fit. Also, measure for proper length from toes to the tip of shoes to prevent irritation and injury.
*No "break-in" period. Your child's shoes should be comfortable to wear immediately and should not require a break-in period for comfort.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Shoe of the Month: Clogs

Look past the tough exterior to find the softer side of clogs. Choose a pair with ultra-soft soles that provide cushioning, such as APMA-accepted Crocs, which are ideal for sufferers of plantar fasciitis, neuromas, bunions, hammertoes, or achy feet. The wide toe box also affords the front of the foot lots of room to move around, making it a very comfortable shoe inside and out. Our pick is Aetrex's Berries Clog, which comes in an astonishing 11 different colors. It has an anti-microbial lining to help prevent fungal and bacterial infections as well as memory foam to provide optimum comfort. It's also easy on, easy off thanks to the design of the Berry. Find this line and the rest of the Aetrex shoes sold exclusively in our office.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Aetrex Shoes Featured on Today Show

We always said that you don't have to sacrifice comfort for style! Aetrex is our leading brand at CCFC for stylish, comfortable shoes. Check out this video from the Today show earlier this month.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Ortiz Out For Week With Bursitis

Red Sox's designated hitter David Ortiz is out for a week with bursitis after telling the baseball team's medical doctors that he was experiencing pain in his right heel.
Bursal sacs are small areas of liquid typically found around joints where tendons attach to the bone. Their primary job is to reduce friction and allow the greatest range of movement. In the foot, there are two bursal sacs where the Achilles tendon attaches to the heel bone. Repetitive motion is often a cause for bursitis.
Ortiz was placed in a walking boot as part of his conservative treatment, and was probably told to ice and stay off the foot. He was not placed on the 15 day disabled list, which means that the Red Sox expect him back shortly. He may also have to wear a heel lift to reduce some of the pressure on his Achilles tendon.
Stretching before any exercise regime is alway recommended and wearing the proper footwear.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Skin Cancer And Your Feet

Summer is often the time we hear more about skin cancer- we're told to avoid the sun if possible and always wear sunscreen when we are in the sun. But many people never think about their feet when they take preventative action, even though malignant melanoma (a serious type of skin cancer) can affect the legs and feet as well as other parts of the body.

Melanomas on the feet can occur in men and women, and while they usually develop in people over the age of 50, they can be found at any age. Lighter-skinned people are more likely to develop melanomas on sun-exposed areas of the body, but only one-third of African-American patients who have melanoma develop it on sun-exposed areas. In the African-American population, melanomas most often develop on skin that is not exposed to the sun, such as the foot and under the toenails. Early detection is extremely important since malignant melanoma can spread (metastasize) rapidly.
Since melanomas on the foot and ankle often go unnoticed during their earliest stage, routine foot examinations can increase the likelihood of diagnosing and treating malignant melanomas. During routine examinations your podiatrist will always look for moles, or "nevi" which are usually evenly colored, round spots on the skin or even under the nails. Most are small and don't change in size or shape. However, the doctor will carefully examine any moles that look abnormal. The podiatrist will use a common dermatological rule (the ABCD rule) to chracterize the melanoma:
*Asymmetrical lesions.
*Border irregularity
*Color variation
*Diameter greater than the size of a pencil eraser.
Skin cancer is rarely painful, so routine podiatric medical visits are important for anyone with questionable lesions on the feet. Other signs to watch for are changes in color or a mole that becomes raised from the skin. Malignant melanomas on the feet usually occur between the toes, in and around the nails, and on the soles of the feet.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Show Those Summer Toes!

With summer here, many of us are ready to shed those heavy shoes and socks in favor of sandals and flip-flops. But over the winter, corns and calluses many have developed, making your feet and toes not quite ready for "prime time". Help is on the way!
Corns and calluses are protective layers of compacted, thick, dead skin cells. They are caused by repeated firction and pressure from skin rubbing against bony areas or against an irregularity in a shoe. Corns ordinarily form on the toes, and calluses on the soles or the balls of the feet. Corns and calluses can also form when the position of the bones in your feet change. The corns and calluses initially form to provide protection, but as they thicken, they can become painful and inflamed.
The friction and pressure from both corns and calluses can cause a painful or burning sensation. Often one visit to the podiatrist can be all that's needed to relieve the pain, although most corns and calluses will reoccur without regular monitoring or changes in either your shoes or your foot function. The podiatric physician can work with you to relieve the pain by using a variety of pads or mateirals on the affected areas.
It is important that you never cut your corns or calluses with any instrument and never apply home remedies, except under a podiatrist's instructions. Many over-the-counter remedies are advertised frequently, but often these home remedies can be dangerous. Self-treatment can often turn a minor problem into a major one.
Corns and calluses can be particularly problematic for patients with diabetes. These patient should always schedule regularly yearly visits with their podiatrist to check for foot problems and circulation issues. If more frequent visits are required, the podiatrist will work with you to make sure your corns and calluses are monitored and treated as needed.
One way to control corns and calluses is to make sure that your shoes fit properly. Purchase new shoes later in the day when feet tend to be at their largest and replace worn out shoes as soon as possible. Select and wear the right shoe for the activity that you are engaged in (i.e. running shoes for running). Also, it is important to alternate shoes- don't wear the same pair of shoes every day.
A visit to your local podiatrist can be all you need to get your feet in shape for summer footwear, so schedule that now and be ready to show off your fancy feet!
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Show-Biz Feet- Be Careful What You Wish For!

If you read the tabloids or watch entertainment television, you may have learned recently that some movie stars are opting for cosmetic foot surgery. These stars of stage and screen are choosing to undergo surgery to correct unsightly problems that are not affecting their gait or comfort; they are having surgery to just look better. While some surgical procuedures that are done to correct painful problems often have comestic implications, opting for foot surgery without pain first may not be a good choice to make.
Among common procedures that are done are foot peels, toe shortening and lengthening, hammertoe and bunion corrections,  ball of the foot injections, to soften the blow from high heels, foot liposuction, and even removal of the pinky toe! All in the name of glamour and fabulous shoes.
According to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) "surgical procedures of the foot and ankle are generally performed for relief of pain, restoration of function, and reconstruction of deformities. They may have the additional benefit of improved appearance. Surgical procedures performed for aesthetic purposes carry the same risks as those performed for medical reasons. Patients considering surgery of the foot or ankle, whether for medical or aesthetic reasons, are advised to consult a member of the APMA." Choosing to undergo any surgical procedure requires careful consideration. Podiatrists performing surgery for medical or aesthetic reasons should have appropriate training, experience, and credentials to perform surgery properly, manage post-operative care, and treat possible complications.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Who Is the Destroyer of Evil?

Answer: Alex Trebek!
The 71 year old host of Jeopardy was in California to open the National Geographic World Championship's final round near Google's Mountain View headquarters when during the night, a burglar broke into his downtown Marriott hotel room around 2:30AM. Trebek and his wife were in bed asleep, but Trebek was awakened by the burglar, 56 year old Lucinda Moyers. Moyers allegedly stole his wallet, cell phone, and a bracelet from his mother and stashed them in an ice machine. Trebek chased Moyers down the hall, where he snapped his Achilles tendon and bruised his other leg. Trebek was slated for surgery on July 29th.
It is not uncommon for Achilles tendon rupture patients to be older, like Trebek, due to the sudden increase in activity. The tendon may have also been degenerating due to his age, or been the symptom of an overuse injury. The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body and connects the calf muscles to the bone. It crucial in any movement that involves the foot and ankle. 
Conservative treatment was originally used in Trebek's case but studies show that surgery for an Achilles tendon rupture is the best method of treatment as the risk of rerepturing is lower. Side effects from the surgery may include infection.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Summer Foot Fixes: Fungal Toenails

Nine percent of men and women have suffered from nail problems. Fungal toenails are thickened, discolored, loose or deformed toenails, typically the result of trauma to the toenail. They are caused by an infection that starts in the skin, like athlete's foot, which can spread to the nails. Fungal toenails are sometimes an indication of other medical problems such as diabetes, arthritis, cancer, and psoriasis. Shoes and socks create a warm, dark, and humid environment, which fungus loves to grow and spread in. It may also be caused by heredity. To prevent fungal toenails, keep shoes and socks dry as a preventative measure. Practice good foot hygiene, including daily washing of the feet with soap and water, drying to feet carefully, especially between the toes. Change shoes regularly and wear acrylic or moisturing wicking shoes, like Aetrex's Copper Socks. Inspect toenails and trim them straight across on a regular basis. Do not use nail polish to cover discoloration. A podiatrist will recommend either Lamisil, a prescription tablet, or Formula 3, a topical remedy.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
 http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Summer Foot Fixes: Foot Odor

Foot odor is an embarrassing condition that can be easily treated. Bromohidrosis, or foot odor, is sweaty, smelly feet that do not itch or appear to have a rash. It is also an increase of perspiration from the more than 250,000 sweat glands in the foot as a result of increased body temperature (hello summer heat!). Foot odor is cuased by closed shoes that aggravate sweaty feet and set up the perfect environment for bacteria to grow, leading to more odor and more sweat, as well as an increased bacterial count on the skin. To prevent foot odor, rub cornstarch or spray antiperspirant directly on the soles of the feet and spray Lysol into shoes. Keep your shoes and socks dry as a preventative measure. Practice good foot hygiene, including daily washing of the feet with soap and water, drying feet carefully, espcially between the toes. Change shoes regularly and wear socks that wick away moisture, like Aetrex's Copper Socks.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copies of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Summer Foot Fixes: Calluses or Corns

Calluses or corns are a painful thickening and build up of skin that forms at points of pressure, over bony prominences, or on the bottom of the foot. They are caused by repeated friction and pressure from skin rubbing against bony areas or against an irregularity in a shoe. Calluses and corns can also be caused by your heredity, tight stockings, and tendon imbalances. To prevent calluses and corns, wear supportive shoes with a wide, roomy toe box and a low heel. You can use over-the-counter creams, but avoid medicated callus-corn remover pads. Make sure to read the label on any over-the-counter products thoroughly to avoid serious complications. If you do not have diabetes, soak feet in warm water, and use a pumice stone or file to treat. Talk to a podiatrist about products such as Pedinol's Ureacin-20 Cream and AmLactin Moisturizing Lotion. Avoid tight-fitting shoes, socks, and hosiery. Do not use heating devices on feet; instead soak in cool water and ice.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will be sent to Connecticut residents only.

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Summer Foot Fixes: Blisters

Blisters are painful, fluid filled lesions that are caused by ill-fitting or stiff shoes, wrinkled socks against the skin, excessive moisture, and foot deformities. To avoid blisters, keep your feet dry and always wear socks as a cushion between your feet and shoes. Wear properly fitting shoes. Never pop a blister. Carefully open a corner of the blister closest to the bottom of te foot with a sterilized utensil like a sewing needle, drain, apply antibiotic cream, and cover with a bandage immediately. Treat a mild blister with soap and water; cover it with an antiseptic ointment and protective dressing. Check the blister regularly to ensure it doesn't get infected. Remove the blister surface if needed. Use padding, such as moleskin to reduce friction.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today! Copies will only be sent to Connecticut residents.

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Travel Tips to Help Prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis

The travel season has begun, time to pack your bags and head off to your favorite destination. But while you're riding in the car or travelling by plane, remember to stretch those legs to help prevents a serious condition known as Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT).
DVT is a condition in which a blood clot (a blockage) forms in vein located deep within the leg. These clots most commonly occur in the veins of the leg, but can also develop in other parts of the body. If the clot breaks loose and travels through the bloodstream, it can lodge in the lung. This blockage in the lung, called a pulmonary embolism, can make it difficult to breathe and may even cause death.
Some people are more at risk than others for developing DVT. Risk factors include varicose veins, blood clotting disorders, pregnancy or recent childbirth, obesity, tobacco use, and heart disease. People over 40 years old, those who have had recent surgery, or those who are immobile through inactivity or wearing a cast are also more at risk for DVT.
People with DVT in the leg may have either no warning signs or their symptoms can be very vague. If any of the following warning signs or symptoms are present, it is important to make an appointment with our office for an evaluation:
*Swelling in the leg
*Pain in the calf or thigh
*Warmth and redness of the leg
If you are at risk for DVT and plan on taking a long trip this season, follow these tips to reduce the likelihood of developing a blood clot:
**Exercise legs every two or three hours to get the blood flowing back to the heart. Walk up and down the aisle of a plane or train, rotate ankles while sitting, and take regular breaks on road trips.
**Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids; avoid caffeine and alcohol.
**Consider wearing compression stockings.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com

Friday, June 17, 2011

Today is National Flip-Flop Day!

It's an unwelcome fact that warm weather lovers don't want to hear: yuor favorite pair of flip-flops is bad for your health. The health of your feet, that is.
A survey by the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) found that 50% of Americans have experienced foot pain or discomfort at some point. Improper footwear if often a chief cause of this pain, and many types of flip-flops can directly cause foot problems due to lack of support and other factors.
"During the warmer months of the year, many podiatrists treat a greater number of foot problems that can be traced back to wearing flip-flops," said Michael King, DPM, president of APMA. "However, people don't have to give up wearing this type of footwear altogether. There are certain types of flip-flops that offer a superior amount of stability and support than others."
Looking to avoid a flip-flop fiasco? View the video below for a list of helpful flip-flop tips, and browse this blog for recommendations on flip-flops.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today!

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Hit the Beach- But Watch Out For Your Feet!

One perk of a beach-bound vacation is looking forward to lounging happily with your toes dangling in the warm weather, shoe-free, with the sand at your feet. Your dream vacation does come it its own set of tootsie troubles. Since we'd all rather spend time collecting sea shells than doctor's bills, there are ways to prevent foot predicaments so you can enjoy your vacation:
*Limit walking barefoot as it exposes feet to sunburn, as well as plantar warts, athlete's foot, ring-worm, and other infections and also increases risk of injury to your feet.
*Wear shoes or flip-flops around the pool, to the beach, in the locker room, and even on the carpeting or in the bathroom of your hotel room to prevent injuries and limit the likelihood of contracting any bacterial infections.
*Remember to apply sunscreen all over your feet, especially the tops and fronts of ankles and don't forget to reapply after you've been in the water.
*Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water throughout the day. This will not only help with overall health, but will also minimize any foot swelling caused by the heat.
*Keep your blood flowing wiht periodic ankle flexes, toe wiggles, and calf stretches. Take a walk and enjoy the view every few hours.
*Some activities at the beach, lake, or river may require different types of footwear, so be sure to ask the contact at each activity if specific shoes are needed. To be safe, always pack an extra pair of sneakers or or protective water shoes. If your shoes will be getting wet, they should be dried out completely before your next wearing to prevent bacteria or fungus from growing.
*If you injure your foot and ankle while on vacation, seek professional medical attention from  podiatric physician.
In case of minor foot problems, be prepared with the following on-the-go kit:
**SUNSCREEN!- to make sure that you protect all of your skin, including your feet, against the scorching sun.
**Flip-flops- for the pool, spa, hotel, and airport security check points. We can recommend some brands that are better for your overall foot health.
**Sterile bandages- for covering minor cuts and scrapes.
**Antibiotic cream- to treat any skin injury.
**Blister pads or moleskin- to protect against blisters.
**Anti-inflammatory medication- to ease tired, swollen feet.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today!

Thursday, June 9, 2011

Gaga Going Googoo Over Foot Pain

We never said that wearing overly high heels was going to win you a Grammy, but it certainly is going to cause you foot pain.
Lady Gaga is seeing a foot specialist, a chiropodist because of pain she is suffering due to her love of high heels (get a definition of what a chiropodist is here: Chirpodist definition). Among cracked, dry heels, Gaga has also gotten severe corns and acute tendonitis.
Gaga has joked that she would "rather die" than be seen wearing flat shoes, saying "You see legendary people taking out the trash. I think it's destroying show business. I'd never give up my wigs and hats for anything. I would rather die than have my fans not see me in a pair of high heels."
The singer is reportedly getting help, including physio on her feet, as well as seeing a podiatrist who recommended wearing sneakers. I can't see that happening, but if the pain is as bad as it sounds, Gaga will have to lay off the high heels or continue in pain! I'm surprised as well that no one recommended orthotics for the star, which would greatly relieve some of the pain she is feeling in her tendons.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today!

Thursday, June 2, 2011

Shoe of the Month: Flip Flops

Even the most intuitive person may havev trouble deciding between the countless flip-flop color and style choices. Select a pair that has some support and is unable to bend in half to minimize foot pain often caused by flip-flops. Blisters are typically caused by poor-fitting straps, so choose a style made of natural materials, such as soft leather, and make sure the foot doesn't hang off the edge. Heel pain sufferers should pass on flip-flops. We recommend Moszkito's flip-flops, which have built-in arch support, designed to help heel pain sufferers. Through the end of the month, mention this blog post, and get $5 off.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

What Are Orthotics?

Orthotics can change your life! Here are some points about orthotics:

*It's like walking on air!
*Orthotics are shoe inserts that correct abnormal or irregular gait problems
*Allow people to walk, stand, and run more effectively and with less pain
*Absorb shock, increase balance, take pressure off sore sports, decrease strain
*Great for diabetic, arthritic and deformed feet.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today!

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Running Injuries and Your Feet

Spring is a great time to get back into your running routine or to ramp up your training and exercise for the coming summer months. But it's always important to take it slowly to train carefully with the advice of an expert to avoid running injuries.
Before you get started, no matter how fit you may be, it's important to remember that stretching before and after a run is a great way to minimize injuries. Choosing proper footwear is very important and your podiatrist can help you choose the right shoe for your level of activity. Finally, you will want to work with the doctor to develop an effective training routine that allows your body (and more importantly, your feet) to adapt to a new level of exercise. But no matter how careful you are, you may end up with some common injuries such as those listed here.
Shin Splints: Shin splints, which are painful and appear at the front and inside of the leg, are often caused by running on hard surfaces, overstriding, muscle imbalance, or overuse. Shin splints can also be related to the shape and structure of your feet. Treatment includes rest, stretching, changing your running technique, and rebalancing foot mechanics with the use of an orthotic device in the shoe. Physical therapy can also be helpful. If you begin to feel this type of pain, slow down, take shorter strides, and see a podiatrist at your first opportunity.
Stress Fractures: A stress fracture is a tiny or incomplete crack in a bone that is often caused by overuse. Stress fractures occur most frequently in the foot and ankle, so your podiatric physician is well trained to diagnose and treat this problem. Signs of a stress fracture are pain that increases with activity and decreases with rest, pain that increases over time or pain that persists even at rest. Often a stress fracture will result in swelling and a spot that feels tender to the touch.
Prompt diagnosis and treatment of a stress fracture can often prevent further injury. A podiatrist can determine your best treatment with x-rays and a physical exam. Many stress fractures can be treated with rest, ice, and over the counter pain relievers. For most people, an appropriate period of rest will be sufficient for the bone to heal, but like all fractures, the bone can take up to 8 to 10 weeks to heal completely. In other cases, your podiatrist may need to immobilize the affected bone with a cast, cast boot, fracture shoe, or a splint. Surgical intervention may be suggested if other, more conservative treatments are not effective.
Blisters and nail problems: Runners often have blisters and nail problems but with a little maintenance and care, they can be avoided or minimized so that they don't limit your ability to keep up your training routine.
Blisters are caused by skin friction. Don't pop them. Apply moleskin or an adhesive bandage over a blister, and leave it on until it falls off naturally in the bath or shower. Keep your feet dry and always wear socks as a cushion between your feet and shoes. If a blister breaks on its own, wash the area, apply an antiseptic, and cover with a sterile bandage.
Ingrown toenails are nails whose corners or sides dig painfully into the skin, often causing friction. They are frequently caused by improper nail trimming but also by shoe pressure, injury, or poor foot structure. Runners are particularly susceptible to nail problems, and long-distance runners often lose some of their toenails entirely while they are training. If an ingrown portion of the nail is painful or infected, your podiatric physician can remove the affected portion to allow for healing. It is possible to permanently remove the offending portion of the nail to prevent occurrence.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today!

Thursday, May 19, 2011

Get Your Feet Fit for Spring

With spring here, we are all looking forward to warming up our bodies for increased activity levels. To make sure that your feet are fit for spring, we offer the following suggestions.
*When starting a new exercise routine, or when ramping up your current one, make sure to ease into that new routine. Stretching before exercising is one way to make sure you are warmed up and ready to go.
*Consider purchasing new shoes for your new level of activity. It's important to have your feet measured, and then choose an athletic shoe that fits your sport. Make sure to break in any new gear appropriately, and ask your podiatric physician for recommendations for your particular needs.
*Take care of your feet. Examine them daily for signs of blisters, corns, and ingrown toenails. Take a few days off your new activity if you see signs of any of these problems.
*Visit your podiatrist periodically to discuss your foot and ankle concerns or just for a check-up before starting a new routine.
*Watch your sun exposure. As the weather improves and our feet are more exposed, it's important to remember sunscreen. The tops of feet are one of the most commonly sunburned areas.
*Seek immediate care for any foot or ankle problem.
Spring is a great time for renewal, but don't let your overeagerness get the best of you. Take the time to enjoy and take care of those two very important assests- your feet.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today!

Thursday, May 5, 2011

Product of the Month: Dr's Remedy Nail Polish

It's almost summertime and the digits on your feet want to show off! What should you do if you have ugly fungal toenails? One product you can use is Dr.'s Remedy Enriched Nail Polish. This polish acts an an antifungal medication for your diseased nails and is a way to cover up those unsightly nails as well. Dr.'s Remedy is made with Vitamins C and E to promote healthier skin and nails, and wheat protein and amino acids. It is a natural polish with tea tree oils and garlic bulb extract, which are naturally occurring antifungal ingredients. What's NOT in this product is Formaldehyde, a chemical that has been proven to cause cancer, DBPs, and Toluene. Now through June 30th, 2011, get $2 off the price of Dr.'s Remedy Nail Polish. Must mention this blog post to get discount.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today!

Shoe of the Month: Chunky Heels

It's no wonder fashion's hottest new footwear staple is none other than the friendly and inventive chunky heel. Know for its relative ease on th feet, the chunky heel offers much more stability than its skinny friend. For best fit, always buy shoes in the afternoon after feet have had some time to swell from the day's activities. Buying shoes when feet are at their largest will ensure the best possible fit.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feel Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today!

Pain in the Ball of the Foot: Neuroma?

"The doctor said I have a neuroma," Jessie told her husband after a visit to her local podiatrist's office. "Now I know why I have that weird pain in the ball of my foot every time I walk or when we go out dancing."
A neuroma, also referred to as a "pinched nerve" is a painful condition involving irritation and/or thickening of the nerve tissue between the toes, most commonly the 3rd and 4th toes. The condition brings on pain, a burning sensation, tingling, or numbness between the toes and in the ball of the foot.
"How did you get that neuroma," Jeff asked Jessie "I'll bet it's from wearing those crazy high heels." Although Jeff may have guessed one god cause of neuromas, there are several other causes as well. Biomechanical deformities, such as a high arch or a flat foot can lead the the formation of a neuroma. Trauma can also cause damage to the nerve, resulting in swelling and inflammation. Repeated stress to the foot, common to some occupations, can create or aggravate a neuroma.
A visit the the podiatrist should be your first step in determing a treatment plan when you have this type of foot pain. The podiatrist can offer a number of treatment options upon diagnosing of a neuroma, including:
  • Padding and taping;
  • Medications such as oral anti-inflammatories, or injections including cortisone or a nerve destructive agent;
  • Orthotic devices;
  • Surgical options when conservative treatments fail.
Jessie found relief with injections which the podiatrist performed in the office and by changing her shoes. Your podiatrist can also recommend ways to relieve the pain of a neuroma including opting for other types of shoes, and resting and icing the foot. This type of pain should not be ignored, and a visit to your podiatrist can often get offer the relief you need.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today!

Thursday, April 28, 2011

Nigella Lawson's Unappetizing Bunions

You have to feel sorry for these celebrities who's bunioned feet end up all over the news. I wish that we could gather them up, take them in for surgery, and fix their problem! In the past Victoria Beckham and Oprah Winfrey have receive media attention for their protruding bunions.
Britain's famous television chef, Nigella Lawson, also known as the "Domestic Goodness", was out shopping in Sydney last week, minding her own business, when photographers caught her in Fit-Flops (a good choice, by the way) with her bunion. Lawson has admitted to being an avid high heel wearer, even saying that she will wear them to bed and use them seductively.
High heels are among the worst culprits of causing bunion problems, as when wearing them your body weight goes forward and puts pressure on the big toe joint. It is important to remember however, that not all wearers of high heels will later in life have bunions. What determines if you are going to have bunions is your foot type, passed down through families or the way you walk.
You will know you have a bunion when your big toe joint starts to jut out from the rest of your foot. Oftentimes bunions are extremely painful; the worst cases are corrected through surgery. You will find it difficult to wear shoes without pain. At the first sign of pain you should seek podiatric attention.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today!

When to See a Podiatrist

Every local drugstore has aisles of "do-it-yourself" medical fixes. For your feet they have blister and corn pads, insoles, fungus sprays, and nail clippers. So when you have foot and ankle problems, how do you know when to deal with them at home using over-the-counter(OTC) products and when to see the podiatrist?
  • Blisters on your feet can often be handled at home without professional intervention. If the blister pops, cover it with a sterile dressing or Band-Aid and watch it carefully to make sure it heals properly.
  • If you suspect that you have an ingrown toenail, it is best not to use OTC products. See your podiatrist as soon as possible to avoid the possibility of infection. The doctor can safely remove the ingrown nail and may be able to alleviate the problem entirely for the future.
  • OTC wart removal medication is relatively mild but can cause ulcerations if left on too long. You can try to alleviate warts on the feet with these products, but the podiatrist has more effective medications and can also do simple procedures to rid you of warts. Wart removers should never be used if you have neuropathy except under the supervision of a podiatrist physician.
  • Despite numerous blogs and articles about treating onychomycosis (fungal nails) and warts with Vicks Vapo-Rub, duct tape, bleach, white vinegar, and other household items, there are no scientific data or evidenced-based research studies to support these treatment options.
  • Sprains and strains can be treated at home initially with the "RICE treatment"- rest, ice, compression, and elevation. If swelling is persistent, a visit to the podiatrist's office is in order to determine if there are any broken bones.
Occasionally, home remedies can cause a new problem or make existing problems worse, so use them all in moderation. Anyone with diabetes or a peripheral vascular disease (PVD) who has foot and ankle problems should always opt to visit the podiatrist for even minor concerns. People who do not have diabetes or PVD should also be wary of pain, color changes, drainage, swelling, heat, or open areas in or on any part of the foot or ankle. These signs warrant a professional's experience in dealing with the problem.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today!

Thursday, April 21, 2011

Fungal Nails: No More!

Fungal nails are an unsightly infection causing thickened, brittle, yellow, discolored nails, and can be sometimes painful. It is very difficult to cure. It is caused by one of several microscopic organisms, similar to those that cause Athlete's Foot (dermatophytosis). These are plant-like organisms that thrive in a dark, warm, moist environment, such as within shoes and stocking. They grow in the nail bed, beneath your nails, and live off Keratin, the protein in the nail. The condition usually begins toward the far end of the nail and may cuase white or yellow-white areas that appera to be rotten or dead. If the infection continues to the base of the nail, it can invade the nail root (matrix) and cause the nail to grow thickened and deformed. Many people complain of a foul odor associated with this condition. It can also spread to other nails.
Sweaty tennis shoes and moist socks create the perfect conditions for them. The fungi thrive in a warm, moist, dark environment and they eat protein keratin that our skin produces. Although fungi may be present in the skin around the nails, it may not develop a nail infection without history of injury, such as bruised toenails from short shoes, inflammation from an ingrown toenail, or from cutting the nails incorrectly or too short. In other words, the organisms do not invade intact, healthy, normal skin or nails. Other contributing factors would be excessive perspiration, and Dermatophytosis (Athlete's Foot), which is caused by similar fungi.
If left untreated, fungal nail infections can affect the entire nail and surrounding skin. Thankfully, there are several options available to rid your toes of unsightly and embarrassing colors or images. Formula 3 is as simple and easy as painting your nails. Oil-soluble, it gets through the nail bed and treats the fungus right away. Most people see a difference in their nails in 6 weeks. Dr.'s Remedy Nail Polish is similar to Formula 3, but is a nail polish with color options. There are a wide variety of colors and it hides unsightly nails during sandal season. SteriShoe Sanitizer is an option to rid your shoes of harmful bacteria. You may think it's enough to tret your feet, but you also need to treat your shoes as well. SteriShoe uses ultraviolet light to kill microorganisms in your shoes.

Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" and "Heal My Heel!" today!

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Common Women's Foot Problems

Let's admit it ladies. We abuse our feet. We put a lot of stress and strain on our lower extremities, and we don't take nearly as good care of them as we should. Based on our need to be fashionable, we often wear shoes that don't fit well or are just not designed for walking and standing for long periods of time. Even Oprah admits that she only wears her highest heels once she's seated during an interview. It's no wonder that those stilettos and peep-toes are causing us pain- they are designed for beauty, not comfort. Women have some of the same foot problems as men, but mostly, our feet have many more "issues".
Bunions are enlargements of the joint at the base of the big toe- the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint- that form when the bone or tissue at the big toe joint moves out of place. Bunions are a symptom of our foot's development due to the way we walk, our inherited foot type, our shoes, or for other reasons. Although bunions tend to run in families, it is the foot type that is passed down- not the bunion. Since the MTP joint carries much of the body's weight while walking, bunions can cause extreme pain if left untreated. Podiatric medical attention should be sought at the first indication of pain or discomfort.
Stress fractures are tiny or incomplete cracks in a bone often caused by overuse. Stress fractures occur most frequently in the foot and ankle and can be caused by a number of factors. An unusual increase in activity causing strain in the foot (fatigue fracture) is one of the most common causes, while weak bones (insufficiency fractures) are caused by medical conditions such as osteoporosis, can also be a factor. Medications such as steroids can lead to stress fractures, as can a sudden increase in activity levels. All of these causes can and should be evaluated by your podiatrist when you notice pain or swelling, which are the symptoms of a stress fracture.
A neuroma, also referred to as a "pinched nerve" is a painful condition involving irritation and/or thickening of the nerve tissue between the toes, most commonly the 3rd and 4th toes. The condition brings on pain, a burning sensation, tingling, or numbness between the toes and in the ball of the foot. Your podiatrist can offer a number of treatment options for a neuroma.
Ingrown toenails are a common ailment seen by podiatric physicians. An ingrown toenail is one whose corners or sides dig painfully into the soft tissue of the toe, often leading to irritation, redness, and swelling. Usually, toenails grow out straight, but sometimes one or both corners or the sides will curve and grow into the flesh. The big toe is the most common site for this condition, but other toes can also become infected.
Ingrown toenails may be caused by any one or more of the following: improperly trimmed nails, shoes that are too tight, trauma, and activities with repeated pressure on the toe (such as running or kicking). There are other causes as well, but this painful condition can usually be esaed with one or two visits to your podiatrist's office
Women may also have a tendency to develop blisters, corns, calluses, and heel pain. All of these conditions can be treated by your podiatrist, and a number of treatment options are available. Once we all realize that our feet don't have to hurt, life will be that much more enjoyable, ladies.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com

Thursday, April 7, 2011

Shoe of the Month: Kitten Heels

April's Shoe of the Month is the kitten heel. Modest and practical, the kitten heel can stand out in a crowd without overdoing it. Kitten heels not only give extra height, but are also a great alternative to reducing pressure on the ball of the foot often caused by a higher heel. Because a kitten heel is typicaly not high than one inch and is a bit wider than the average heel, it offers more comfort and stability. Keep in mind, a heel that is three inches heel creates seven times more stress than a one inch heel.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com/
Order your free copy of our books "Why Do My Feet Hurt?" or "Heal My Heel!" today!

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

Right Shoe for the Right Sport

April is Foot Health Awareness Month and the American Podiatric Medical Association has teamed up with First Lady Michelle Obama's campaign, "Let's Move" to shine the spotlight on childhood obesity and the importance of keeping children active and healthy. This new campaign launched by APMA is called "Today's Podiatrist Keeps America Moving". Sports and physical activities are an excellent way for children to stay active and healthy. Check out this video from APMA:

One of the tip sheets APMA has provided is aimed at helping parents pick out the right shoe for their child's sport. Selecting the proper shoe for the sport goes above and beyond just heading to the athletics section of the shoe store. To help your child free from serious foot and ankle injuries purchase a shoe that fits not only their foot but the activity as well.
Basketball
This is often the first organized sport children will get involved in and it's important to start them off with the right shoe that helps them perfect their basketball handling skills and prevents injuries.
A basketball shoe should:
*Have a thick, stiff sole that helps give support while running and landing from jumps to the basket.
*Incorporate high ankle construction that supports the ankle during quick changes in direction.
*Have the strongest support on either side of the ankle.
Cleats
Outdoor sports like baseball, softball, soccer, football, and lacrosse keep children's feet moving. This type of footwear should help prevent tripping and falling.
A shoe with cleats should:
*Fit snugly but comfortably on a child's foot- about one thumb width or less from the toe to the end of the shoe. Oversized soccer shoes can affect balance and cause blisters.
*Feature a rubber sole, to keep prevent slipping and injury, and a leather upper material.
*Cleats on the sole should be regulation length.
Tennis
Court shoes for tennis and raquetball may look like any other athletic sneaker, but it's what's on the inside that makes the difference on a child's feet.
A tennis shoe should:
*Support both sides of the foot, due to the quick lateral movements and weight shifts in court sports.
*Provide a flexible sole for fast changes of direction.
Running
Running shoes come in several different styles that support feet with different arch types.
A running shoe should:
*Provide maximum shock absorption to help young runners avoid ailments such as shin splints and knee pain.
*Control the way a child's heel strikes the ground, so the rest of hte foot can fall correctly.
*Fit your child's specific arch type. To determine arch type, see a podiatrist.
For a list of sports-related footwear with APMA's Seal of Acceptance, visit: http://www.apma.org/seal and click on Seal of Acceptance and then on Children's Foot Products.
Dr. Tina A. Boucher, DPM
Central Connecticut Foot Care, LLC
Podiatrist Meriden CT
http://www.centralctfootcare.com